Our Corporate Family

Taubman is a great place to work. Everyone’s talents and contributions are respected. Our employee programs and benefits support our associates’ physical, emotional, financial and social well-being. Our excellent healthcare plans and wellness programs are just two of the reasons Taubman received the following distinctions in 2016: Crain’s Cool Places to Work, Detroit’s 101 Best and Brightest Companies to Work For, Detroit Free Press’ Top 100 Workplaces and Best and Brightest Companies to Work For in the Nation.

Community Engagement

Taubman people contribute to the health and success of the communities they serve. Community outreach programs in Greater Detroit and in the markets where Taubman centers operate help charities, schools and civic organizations fulfill their important missions. We understand the importance of healthy communities to the ongoing success of our properties, which serve as vibrant employment centers and are drivers of much-needed municipal revenue. The activity and commerce at Taubman centers help fund schools, police forces, fire departments and public works across the nation.

Taubman strives to make a positive difference by supporting vital nonprofits that transform our communities, respect our planet, develop tomorrow’s leaders and strengthen our industry.

For example, in 2016 nearly 200 Taubman employees teamed up to beautify the neighborhood near Denby High School, boarding up homes and clearing tons of trash and over-grown brush to create safer pathways for the students.

Taubman Volunteer Day 2016 Video

Following are two more examples of Taubman's community commitment at work.

Perpetuating a Humanitarian Legacy at International Market Place

Jeff Boes
Director Planning & Design

Hawaii’s International Market Place, which opened in 2016, has a story to tell and a mission to fulfill. Located on six acres owned by the Queen Emma Land Co. in the heart of Waikiki, the center through its revenues directly supports the Queen’s Medical Center, the state’s largest private non-profit hospital. In addition to enjoying great shopping and dining, visitors to International Market Place learn about the area’s rich cultural traditions and the lasting legacy of the beloved woman known to Hawaiians and history as Queen Emma.

In 1856, Emma Kalanikaumaka`amano Na`ea Rooke married Alexander ʻIolani Liholiho, who a year earlier had assumed the throne as Kamehameha IV. The mid-19th century was a time of dramatic social and economic change for Hawaiians. There was a critical need for improved healthcare to help the native population struggling with deadly European diseases to which they had little or no resistance. With the public treasury already stretched thin, the King and Queen went door-to-door, walking the streets of Honolulu raising funds to establish a hospital there. In honor of Queen Emma’s tireless efforts, the King and his cabinet named the new hospital The Queen’s Hospital, which opened with 18 beds in 1859.

“When we designed this center, we were guided by three objectives. We wanted to honor the legacy of Queen Emma, continuing her mission to improve the health and well-being of the Hawaiian people; celebrate the history and culture of Waikiki; and revitalize this iconic commercial district. I think we’re succeeding on all three fronts.”– Jeff Boes

Today’s Queen’s Medical Center and The Queen’s Health Systems are supported through revenues generated by the lands, including the International Market Place site, bequeathed by Queen Emma when she passed away in 1885. “When we designed this center, we were guided by three objectives,” said Director Planning & Design Jeff Boes. “We wanted to honor the legacy of Queen Emma, continuing her mission to improve the health and well-being of the Hawaiian people; celebrate the history and culture of Waikiki; and revitalize this iconic commercial district. I think we’re succeeding on all three fronts.”

Visitors to International Market Place are able to take a cultural journey, assisted by a family of interpretive signs, plaques and graphics presenting the natural history of the area and the inspiring story of Queen Emma. Cultural programming and hula dancing on the Queen’s Court performance stage pay tribute to Waikiki’s unique traditions. And plantings throughout the center feature species Queen Emma incorporated into the landscaping at her residences.

“We’re proud of the role we play in this community,” said Boes. “The special character of Waikiki is woven into the architecture of the center, and it’s great to know that our efforts support such an important public need here in Hawaii. I hope that Queen Emma would be pleased.”

Contributing to Sustainable Communities at The Mall at University Town Center

Lauren Clark
Marketing & Sponsorship Director

The Mall at University Town Center in Sarasota, Florida, opened in 2014 as one of the most technologically advanced shopping centers ever built. A state-of-the-art fiber-optic infrastructure assures efficient operation of the center’s energy, life-safety, lighting and HVAC systems. Adjustable louvers filter sunlight flowing through skylights fitted with heat-deflecting high-performance glass. Car-charging stations are available for electric vehicles.

But when Marketing & Sponsorship Director Lauren Clark discusses the center’s impressive sustainability commitment, she looks beyond technology. “Connecting with our communities on a human level is as important as conserving energy and being good stewards of the environment,” said Clark. “Taking advantage of our central location and the important commercial role we play within the Sarasota-Manatee region, we’ve created a range of programs for young and young-at-heart focused on health, fitness, education and fun.”

“Taking advantage of our central location and the important commercial role we play within the Sarasota-Manatee region, we’ve created a range of programs for young and young-at-heart focused on health, fitness, education and fun.”– Lauren Clark

In partnership with Lakewood Ranch Medical Center, the mall hosts “Walk and Talk” wellness seminars each week, a “Healthy Walkers” mall-walker program, and a health-themed children’s play area. Every Sunday morning, The Mall at University Town Center teams with its athletic-wear merchants to offer “Fab & Fit” yoga classes. Thursday mornings during the summer months, “Summer Fun Club” events feature such activities as cookie decorating, music singalongs and face painting for kids.

“We’re fortunate to be a part of the multi-use, master-planned University Town Center development,” said Clark. “When you think about sustainability, it’s great to have retail, residential, commercial and recreational opportunities all within walking distance. Walking is a highly energy-efficient mode of transportation, and the close proximity of all these uses strengthens each component. It also allows us to share resources.” Adjacent to the mall is Nathan Benderson Park and its world-class rowing facility, which is hosting the 2017 World Rowing Championships. “They’ll be sharing our parking facilities during the event, and I’m sure there will be plenty of shoppers among the visitors from the 67 countries represented in the competition.”

Beginning in the fall of 2017, The Mall at University Town Center will be hosting art shows twice each year in conjunction with the Ringling College of Art and Design. “Sarasota is recognized around the world for its vibrant art offerings,” said Clark. “Connecting with our market’s active cultural community is another way we can help our region continue to thrive.”

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